Posts Tagged ‘Financial Attorney’

Variable Annuity Exchanges & Replacements: Annuity Loss – Annuity Fraud – Did You Get Shafted by Your Broker?

May 11th, 2011

There is a continuing problem for investors relating to the improper sale or switching by investment advisors of variable annuities that can be annuity fraud and result is annuity losses. Many older investors have been counseled by their brokers to replace their old variable annuity contracts with new ones. In many cases it may be unsuitable and result in the creation of fees and commissions for the advisor, surrender charges for the investor and new long term non-liquid investment. Furthermore, adding insult to injury, in some cases advisors have neglected to exercise due diligence by assuring that the exchange of those annuities was tax free under Internal Revenue Code (Section 1035).

If done properly, exchanging variable annuities should be tax free.
In a tax-free 1035 exchange, the owner of a variable annuity replaces the current contract with a new contract. No tax is paid on the investment gains or income from the old variable annuity. If, however, an investor gives up his or her old annuity for cash and then uses that money to buy a new annuity, he or she will have to pay taxes on the old annuity.

Variable annuities can be fraught with hidden costs.
An additional problem with variable annuities is that exchanging and replacing them often results in surrender charges. Customers must pay these charges when annuities are surrendered before the end of their given surrender period. Usually, that’s six to eight years from the purchase date. Because surrender charges reduce the amount of money available for reinvestment in a new annuity, they also lower an investor’s potential return. And if that weren’t bad enough, the new replacement annuity has a new surrender period, so funds are ordinarily locked into place for another six to eight years.

In general, seniors shouldn’t invest in them.
Because of the risks, high fees and surrender charges associated with variable annuities, they’re poor financial choices for most investors over 65. In fact, California law requires that selling agents prove that an annuity replacement is of “substantial benefit” to their senior clients.

FINRA oversight of variable annuities is increasing.
The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) has recently implemented new rules regarding broker recommendations to purchase and exchange variable annuities, making variable annuities one of the few securities products with its own suitability requirements. These new rules require that brokerage firms put supervisory procedures into practice for the detection and prevention of “inappropriate exchanges.”

Should you contact a securities attorney?
If you’re an older investor whose financial advisor has advised to exchange or replace variable annuities, resulting in a loss in your annuity either fraom annuity fraud or simple negligence, call Carlson Law for a free consultation at 619-544-9300. Furthermore, if your broker failed to facilitate a tax-free 1035 exchange of variable annuities, contact our firm. Your broker may be liable for any or all fees, taxes and financial loss you incurred as a result.

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Posted in Fiduciary Duty Breach, Investment Fraud, Negligent Misrepresentation, Securities Arbitration, Securities Fraud, Securities Law, Securities Litigation, Stock Fraud, Stock Loss | Comments (4)

Trusting Your Financial Advisor – Do You Really Know Who is Handling Your Life Savings?

April 15th, 2011

There are over 210 possible different credentials available to financial advisors.  Very few of those credentials are regulated and some mean little or nothing.  It is important for every investor to do their homework and really get to know their financial advisor, their credentials, licensing and experience.  Simply because your advisor has many credentials or friends have recommended them is not enough.

While the CFP (Certified Financial Planner) and CFA (Certified Financial Advisor) designations require course work, exams and continuing education many certifications in the financial industry do not.   So what should an investor do in order to select a financial advisor? There are a number of things that can be done.

  1. Everyone can go and look up the record of the advisor they are considering using on the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority’s BrokerCheck service.  The BrokerCheck service will give you important information about the advisor you are considering; such as if that advisor has had prior complaints, been sued before, where he or she has worked in the past and for how long,  the reason they left a prior employer, in addition to information about licensing and credentials.
  2. Next, look at the information from state securities regulators at the North American Securities Administrators Association.
  3. Also, review the National Association of Insurance Commissioners website regarding the advisor you are considering using.

A good question to ask a prospective advisor regarding their credentials is what percentage of people who apply for the credential obtain it?  Also, feel free to ask about the qualifications of the instructors for the credential program touted.  As an investor interviewing a financial advisor, you should be careful if the advisor is put off or unable to answer such simple questions.

If you have already fallen victim to an unqualified investment advisor and suspect an incidence of investment fraud, please call the Carlson Law Firm at (619) 544-9300 or contact a San Diego securities fraud attorney today.

 

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Posted in Broker Fraud, Fiduciary Duty Breach, Investment Fraud, Negligent Misrepresentation, Securities Arbitration, Securities Fraud, Securities Law, Securities Litigation, Stock Fraud, Stock Loss | Comments (11)